24
Sep
14

The Cost of Whistleblowing

In Communist Russia and Nazi Germany the people raising an eyebrow about what was going on were simply rounded up and killed. Today though those who speak out are simply ostracized by society – even if what they leaked was in the best interest for the society to know.

As Ron Paul said, “Truth is treason in an empire of lies.”

Original article below found at The Guardian.

This week, the Securities and Exchange Commission made history by promising an anonymous overseas whistleblower a reward of $30m.

It doesn’t usually work out that way for whistleblowers. Ringing the bell on abuse in a company or government usually means losing jobs and status. The norm is pariah treatment and low-wage jobs, as well as trips to the welfare office and the lingering threat of prosecution or intimidation.

Consider: it’s not every day that you get to buy an iPhone from an ex-NSA officer. Yet a number of people visiting the Washington metro-area Apple store get to do just that. For over a year now, several days a weekThomas Drake puts on his blue Apple work T-shirt and goes to work.

Drake, former senior executive at National Security Agency, is well known in the national security circles. In 2006, he leaked information about the NSA’s Trailblazer project to Baltimore Sun. Years later, in 2010, he was prosecuted under the Espionage Act, but the government ended up dropping all 10 felony charges against him. He pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge for unauthorized use of a computer.

Drake, unlike other NSA whistleblowers, has the freedom to move freely within any city or state within America. His freedom, however, comes with a very tangible price: his livelihood.

“You have to mortgage your house, you have to empty your bank account. I went from making well over $150,000 a year to a quarter of that,” Drake says in Silenced, a recently released documentary depicting the lives of several national security whistleblowers. Silenced, which made its debut at the Tribeca Film Festival, is to be screened at additional movie festivals this fall. “The cost alone, financially – never mind the personal cost – is approaching million dollars in terms of lost income, expenses and other costs I incurred.”

“Obviously, I am a persona non grata within the government … and so I am unemployed,” Drake says to the cameras in Silenced. “I did look for work. I spent a lot of time looking for work. I applied for a part-time position with Apple, and several month later I actually got a phone call. I ended up working at an Apple store in the metro DC area as an expert.”

This kind of result is what most whistleblowers can expect. The potential threat of prosecution, the mounting legal bills and the lack of future job opportunities all contribute to a hesitation among many to rock the boat.

President Obama has approved legislation to help protect federal whistleblowers against retaliation and economic ruin. In November 2012,Obama signed Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act into law, which was to expand whistleblower protections available to corporate whistleblowers to federal workers.

Yet whistleblowers have been left on their own to struggle with the consequences of going public.

Jesselyn Radack says whistleblowers need better protections. She is a former Justice Department ethics attorney and whistleblower who went on to defend Drake and Kiriakou. She is currently one of Edward Snowden’s lawyers.

“The Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act … has a big loophole that covers national security and intelligence officials, people exactly like Tom Drake at the NSA, Edward Snowden at NSA, and John Kiriakou at CIA, Steven Kim at the State Department, Jeffrey Sterling at the CIA, Peter van Buren, who was at the State Department – the people that I would argue we most need to hear from and want to hear from,” says Radack, noting that Obama’s order applies only to employees – not to contractors such as Edward Snowden.

Finance whistleblowers can, theoretically, collect awards ranging from $300,000 to $104m for disclosing secrets about their employers cheating on taxes and violating securities law. Activist investor Bill Ackman offered a $250,000-per-year-for-10-years deal to an employee of Herbalife for supporting Ackman’s thesis that the company fools its workers and customers. The company and other hedge fund managers, including Carl Icahn, dispute Ackman’s remarks.

The price of leaking national security problems, in particular, is steep. National security whistleblowers have no prospect of financial rewards.

Kiriakou, a former CIA analyst, became the first former government official to confirm the use of waterboarding against al-Qaida suspects in 2009. Three years later, in 2012, he was prosecuted for leaking classified information under the Espionage Act. After he was accused of violating the Espionage Act, Kiriakou had to look for employment outside the field of national security.

“I have applied for every job I can think of – everything from grocery stores to Toys R Us to Starbucks. You name it, I’ve applied there. Haven’t gotten even an email or a call back,” Kiriakou says at some point in the film. “I’ll be honest with you, I really miss working and so regardless of what the job is, I’ll be happy to just pass eight hours a day.”

He was not the only one in his family to lose his job as a result of his disclosures. His wife quit her job because of threats of security investigations, says Kiriakou.

After both of them were unemployed for seven months, she informed him that they couldn’t afford food for the next week. In the days to follow, they found themselves at a welfare office, where they were told they qualified for a variety of assistance including food stamps, medicaid and job training.

The stark reality of their financial situation was enough to get Kiriakou to consider changing his plea. That, and the possibility of not seeing his children grow up.

“She doesn’t make enough money to support our household. We could borrow enough for two years to keep her going,” he says. “But if I am found guilty and get more than two years, I mean – we think we are ruined now? – we’d be ruined permanently after that. I want to fight it but I have kids and I just can’t risk them losing me for six to twelve years.”

Kiriakou is currently serving a 30-month jail sentence. Instead of telling his children that he is going to jail, Kiriakou and his wife have told them that he is going to Pennsylvania to “teach bad guys how to get their diplomas.”

With Kiriakou in jail, his family continues to struggle to make ends meet.

“They are still in dire straits, living from pay check to pay check,” Radack told the audience at the New America after recently held screening of Silenced. A Facebook page, Defend John Kiriakou, lists instructions on how to contribute to Kiriakou’s commissary account. Another post invites supporters to buy him a subscription to The New York Times’ Sunday edition. Radack already purchased him a Monday through Saturday subscription. He receives all papers two days after they are published.

“I am sitting in front of you as a free human being, I can’t tell you what it means to be free,” Drake told the audience after the screening. “I paid an incredibly high price.”

24
Aug
14

2014 Mesa, Arizona, Mayor race

2014 Mesa, Arizona, Mayor race – check out Danny Ray.

Mesa_DannyRay

Mesa has a choice this August:

• Do you want to continue building massive debt? The City of Mesa has amassed a total debt of nearly $1.5 BILLION (billion with a B). Since 1984, our debt has increased tenfold. Since just 2003, our debt has nearly doubled with no significant change in population size.

• Do you want your cost of living to keep rising? The cost of city services and taxes (water, sewer, trash, sales tax, and property tax) is rising much faster in Mesa than in neighboring communities. In 2004, Mesa boasted the lowest average cost of living and provided services at less than $1,200 per household. We have since increased to over $1,800 annually, surpassing Chandler, Gilbert, and even Scottsdale. This rapid increase reflects the fact that all city fees have been creeping up to satisfy interest payments on our massive debt.

• Do you want a healthy local economy? Economic vitality comes from free-market principles with a level playing field for businesses of all sizes. It is not within the scope of government to pick winners and losers; rather, government is obligated to treat all businesses equally under the law. This is not the way things currently stand. In addition, red tape created by an inefficient and costly permitting process is driving employers, shops, and services to neighboring communities.

Danny is working to bring attention to these important issues and increase citizen engagement in government. The burden is on us as citizens to fully engage and keep the rights and liberties that our Founding Fathers secured for us. We CAN work together as the people of Mesa to reverse the trend toward more control and less freedom.

Danny’s opponent is for continuing Mesa’s “upward momentum” but Danny believes we can continue to have positive growth and preserve the community we love WITHOUT massive debt.

22
Aug
14

Has Freedom Finally Arrived? No, We’ll Have to Bring It!

Originally Found at CATO HERE.

The New York Times wonders if the libertarian moment has arrived. Unfortunately, there’ve been false starts before.

Ronald Reagan’s election seemed the harbinger of a new freedom wave. His rhetoric was great, but actual accomplishments lagged far behind.

So, too, with the 1994 Republican takeover of Congress.  Alas, the GOP in office behaved little different than many Democrats.

Since then there’s been even less to celebrate—in America, at least. George W. Bush was an avid proponent of “compassionate,” big-government conservatism. Federa outlays rose faster than under his Democratic predecessor. Barack Obama has continued Uncle Sam’s bailout tradition, promoting corporate welfare, pushing through a massive “stimulus” bill for the bank accounts of federal contractors, and seizing control of what remained private in the health care system.

Over the last half century, members of both parties took a welfare state that was of modest size despite the excesses of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal and put it on a fiscally unsustainable basis as part of the misnamed “Great Society.” Economist Lawrence Kotlikoff figures government’s total unfunded liability at around $220 trillion.

The national government has done no better with international issues. Trillions went for misnamed “foreign aid” that subsidized collectivism and autocracy. Trade liberalization faces determined resistance and often is blocked by countries that would gain great benefits from global commerce.

Even worse has been foreign policy. The joy people felt from the collapse of the Berlin Wall a quarter century ago has been forgotten.

The defense budget has turned into a new form of foreign aid for America’s populous and prosperous allies. The United States has been constantly at war, repeatedly proving that the Pentagon is no better at social engineering than is any other government agency.

Americans across the political spectrum agree that something is wrong, that the status quo is no good. But they disagree on the remedy.

However, the answer shouldn’t be that hard to discern. The definition of insanity, runs the old adage, is to keep doing the same thing while expecting different results.

By that definition, Washington policymakers are insane. The economy is slowing, people are falling behind economically, freedoms are being lost, and security fears are rising? No problem. Roll out the usual failed nostrums.

We know what the effect of these policies will be. All we have to do is look around the world and see what has happened.

It is this reality, not new personalities or generations, that is creating a libertarian moment. The 20th century killed off communism and fascism as serious alternatives. The chief competitor to this systems was not laissez-faire capitalism, as some suggested, but highly regulated and monumentally expensive welfare states. They were freer and more prosperous than their geopolitical antagonists—even a little capitalism goes a long way—but the erosion of liberty and prosperity has been constant.

Perhaps more debilitating was the corrosive effect on the foundational principles of a free society, such as independence, self-reliance, responsibility, accountability, and more. This assault in America continues with, for instance, the federal government turning health care into another massive entitlement, highlighted by pervasive regulation and income redistribution.

The obvious—and only—alternative to more government, which has failed so badly, is less government. Lower tax rates and rationalize complex tax systems. Cut the wasteful looting and pillaging that is a hallmark of today’s transfer society. Repeal unnecessary and relax unnecessarily stringent regulations, while making legitimate rules more market-friendly. Model liberty, prosperity, tolerance, and peace for others, allowing individual Americans going abroad to be America’s best ambassadors.

Has the libertarian moment arrived? The tyranny of the status quo, as Milton Friedman termed it, remains omnipresent and powerful. As a result, I point out in the Freeman, “the libertarian moment will not ‘arrive.’  It will have to be brought forward by those committed to a better and freer America.”

12
Aug
14

Pagliacci vs Robin Williams

00ZKlRZ

 

This is a little late as I don’t like to ride the bandwagon… but this is touching. You never know who is hurting and suicide knows no boundaries of color, wealth, fame, athleticism, or parental upbringing.

06
Aug
14

2014 Primary Election: Arizona, CD5, LD17 (Chandler)

It is my duty as a citizen to vote and participate in politics. I consider myself a heavily leaning Conservative Libertarian and these are my initial thoughts on who to vote for in CD5/LD17.

FEDERAL:

REPRESENTATIVE, CD5: Salmon, Matt (no contest)

 

STATE:

GOVERNOR: Frank Riggs

STATE SENATE, LD17: Yarbrough, Steve (no contest)

STATE REPRESENTATIVE, LD17 (2): Mesnard, J.D.; Weninger, Jeff

SECRETARY OF STATE: Wil Cardon [1]

ATTORNEY GENERAL: Horne, Tom [2]

STATE TREASURER: DeWit, Jeff

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION: Douglas, Diane

STATE MINE INSPECTOR: Hart, Joe (no contest)

CORPORATION COMMISSIONER (2): Little, Doug; Forese, Tom [3]

 

COUNTY:

COUNTY ASSESSOR: Petersen, Paul (no contest)

CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT: Jeanes, Michael (no contest)

 

CITY OF CHANDLER:

MAYOR: Tibshraeny, Jay (no contest)

COUNCILMEMBER (3): Roe, Terry; Hartke, Kevin [4]

 

PROPOSITION:

470: Yes

 

NOTES:

[1] I do not get a warm and fuzzy with anyone for Secretary of State. Reagan seems like Brewer who gave us Common Core. Pierce seems unenthusiastic. And Cardon is the rich-boy. Cardon may be the pretty-boy that doesn’t have any political ties or favors to repay.

[2] This is another toss-up. Nobody here is really pleasant to vote for in GOP. Brnovich Horne are neck-and-neck but neither of them really float my boat. I know that many people will shy away from Horne from his reputation but I personally feel that people enjoy slinging mud at him – none of the accusations have stuck. Is he really good at covering up or did someone paint a target at him that we all haven’t seen? I believe I erad that Brnovich hasn’t bothered practicing in quite some time.

[3] Ah, corporations. They are good… and bad. This seems like one of those positions that it will be hard to get into unless you have some sort of secret back-door money (uh, from corporations). That is the rumor with Little/Forsee but who knows.

[4]  I like Roe and voted for him last time. Hartke also seems like he has done decent. I am allowed three, but I don’t know if I will vote for three.

NOTE: Also to note locally, but out of my area that you may want to consider:

TEMPE: Matt Papke for Tempe City Council

MESA: Danny Rey for Mesa Mayor

LD20: Thurane Auck Khin for State Representative

03
Aug
14

A Message From Arizona’s Frank Riggs

Below is a message from Frank Riggs, a contender for the Arizona Governor position.

Dear Friend of Liberty,

I’m Frank Riggs, Republican candidate for governor of Arizona. I’m writing to ask for your support and vote in the Republican Primary. Mail ballot voting begins July 31st and primary election day is August 26th. The stakes are great if we’re going to restore fiscal responsibility, constitutionally limited government, free markets and personal liberty in our state and country.

I’m the only candidate for governor with a deep and proven record of defending our liberties, constitutional principles and core conservative values. I’ve taken three oaths in my life: the soldier’s oath when I enlisted in the Army (I’m the only vet running for governor), the law enforcement oath to protect and serve the public when I became a police officer out of the Army, and the oath of office to support and defend the U.S. Constitution when I was sworn into Congress where I served three terms.

Actually, as I think about it, my fourth and most important oath was when I married my wife Cathy 34 years ago. Cathy’s a native daughter of Arizona born in Tucson. We’re the proud parents of three adult children, all married, and three grandchildren (our most recent grandchild was born July 24th!). Cathy and I met when we were both police officers and she shares my concern regarding the increasing militarization of law enforcement, especially at the federal level. There’s simply no constitutional justification for heavily armed, paramilitary law enforcement units in federal land use agencies like the BLM and Forest Service. I know you share the same concern. In fact, the pictures of the BLM “swat team” preparing to confront the Bundy family and their supporters with military-style weapons should shock the conscience of every liberty-loving American.

Here’s my statement on the role and responsibilities of law enforcement based on my (and Cathy’s) actual experience as police officers:

“As a police officer you’re trained that you’re best, most effective tool is your mouth and you learn quickly on the streets how to control and de-escalate situations verbally. Physical force is always a last resort. That’s how I conducted myself as a police officer and deputy sheriff for small and medium-sized law enforcement agencies.

When both Cathy and I were cops, federal law enforcement agencies (FBI, DEA) would always notify and coordinate their activities with local law enforcement. It was then their standard protocol to conduct search and seizure and arrest activities with and through local law enforcement, and should be now. There is absolutely no rationale or constitutional justification for federal land-use agencies (BLM and Forest Service) to have heavily-armed, paramilitary SWAT teams. As governor, I will notify them that they have no authority in Arizona and must stand-down, and that legitimate federal law enforcement agencies involved in interstate drug and crime interdiction must coordinate with state and local law enforcement in every instance, with the exception of the Border Patrol and Customs on or near the border (where they belong and the federal government should be focused on aggressively enforcing the law!).”

I recently met with members of the Arizona Liberty Caucus in Phoenix, thanks to John Laurie who arranged the meeting. We reviewed and discussed the candidate survey I completed which is attached. The meeting was informative and productive, and as you might imagine, a lively discussion and exchange of ideas! I hope you agree that my views are very consistent with the positions of the Liberty Caucus.

As a U.S. Congressman, I was proud to be a member of the Republican Liberty Caucus, a group of Republican members of the House of Representatives dedicated to individual rights, limited government and free enterprise. In my third and last term, I was asked by Speaker Newt Gingrich to chair the House Education Subcommittee, and along with Congressman Ron Paul, also a member of the Subcommittee, authored legislation converting federal education funds to block grants (the next best thing to eliminating that unconstitutional agency altogether, which was impossible with Bill Clinton in the White House). In fact, Dr. Paul and I served together at the only time in modern history when we were able to actually cut federal government spending and reduce the size, scope, reach and power of the federal government. When I left Congress to keep my term limits commitment, the federal budget was balanced and generated surpluses for four consecutive years thereafter, and we had fundamentally reformed welfare by imposing time limits and work requirements on welfare recipients.

My voting record earned me the highest ratings and endorsements of National Right to Life and the NRA, and accolades from other national organizations supporting school choice, private property rights, taxpayers, small business and free enterprise. I’m proud of my endorsements by Arizonans Against Common Core (for my promise to repeal Common Core on Day One and restore local control in K-12 education), the Arizona Chapter of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (for my promise to fight Medicaid expansion under Obamacare and protect patient and doctor rights) and from the National Vietnam and Gulf War Veterans Coalition, consisting of 70 veterans organizations and representing 250,000 veterans.

I’ve also been endorsed by State Senator Judy Burges, former State Senate Majority Leader Thayer Verschoor, and former State Senator and current Navajo County Supervisor Sylvia Allen. Undoubtedly, my “loudest” endorsement has come from Ted Nugent (yes, that Ted Nugent!). The “Nuge” is a proud patriot and outspoken defender of our individual liberties and unalienable rights, as endowed by our Creator, and enshrined and protected in the Constitution and Bill of Rights. All of these endorsements are on my campaign website where you can find more information about my candidacy and ways to help my campaign: www.riggsforazgov.com.

In closing, I want you to know I’m committed to protecting our state sovereignty and all Arizonans against federal government overreach. My candidacy threatens the political establishment because I can’t be bought and am not “owned” by them, nor do I “owe” anyone political favors. My character and leadership capabilities were forged by my military, law enforcement and congressional service that taught me the absolute importance of honesty and integrity. While my primary opponents are running their campaigns on bombastic, untested rhetoric and would require “on-the-job training,” I’m running on my deep, proven record. I’m tested and vetted, including by the Arizona Liberty Caucus, and ready to lead on Day One. You can trust me to be a champion of liberty, and the strong and courageous governor we need to make our state a bastion of freedom and a shining example of constitutionally limited government…of, by and for the people.

Yours in the Cause of Liberty!

Frank Riggs

20
Jul
14

What Political Lean Will Today’s Kids Have?

I am the oldest kid in my family. On my mom’s side I am the oldest cousin too. On the “big two” subjects that will surely ruffle feathers, religion and politics, I have been all over the board and never fit neatly into any one group. Furthermore, I’ve openly discussed these things despite my mother’s advice to keep those subjects off the radar. With that said to some people they know that I am political, or at least politically-minded. I have been surprised to hear so many people discuss their political beliefs with me that I felt were right-leaning. Or more specifically, Libertarian-leaning. Maybe the next generation’s political beliefs are swinging back towards Conservatism. More interesting is what these kids use to judge their beliefs – how big of a role do their parents, demographic groups, or media play in making those decisions?

The conclusion of the article to me is interesting to me. It states, “What if the Republican party starts to promote candidates who simply can’t be painted as sexually repressive, oil-crazed religious freaks?” I find this interesting because I’ve long since said that the GOP needs to ditch its religious cloak. Religious affiliation is the number one complaint I hear for people who I think are clearly Republicans but vote Democrat.

Could the next generation of Republicans already be here? by Kyle Smith.

There’s probably never been a time when humanity wasn’t collectively in a torment and uproar about what its young folk were up to. (Gur to Urp, 10,000 B.C.: “Can you believe how short the girls are wearing their bearskins these days?”)

But in contrast with our image of decadent, self-centered, pleasure-craving youth, in many ways today’s youngsters are throwbacks — spurning drugs, crime and disorder, being sexually responsible and making sound choices about education. They might be the least disaffected, least rebellious kids since the Kennedy years. And that might have surprising political implications down the road.

A July 12 Economist piece reviewed some surprising data, finding that (contrary to popular belief) teen drinking and binge drinking have fallen sharply in recent years. The percentage of high-school seniors who have ever taken alcohol, for instance, fell from 80% to 71% from 2000 to 2010. In 1980, that figure was 93%. Asked whether they’d had a drink in the last 30 days, only 41% said yes in 2010. In 2000, it was 50% and in 1980, 72%. Similarly, the teen pregnancy rate is slightly more than half what it was in the mid-1990s, and teens are waiting longer to have sex than they did then.

Violent-crime arrests for people from 10 to 24 are half what they were in 1995 (for males) and down 40% for females. Juvenile incarceration is at its lowest rate since 1975. Teen smoking peaked around 1997 and is now, at an all-time low of 17%, less than half of what it was then. (Pot use is an exception to the trend: 23% of high-school seniors regularly get high. But weed is still less widely used than it was in the 1970s, or even in 1999, when 26.7% reported regular use.)

What’s behind all these surprising numbers? I can’t say, but it’s hard not to notice that a decline in destructive behavior associated with peer pressure has happened at the same moment that the US became a fully wired nation.

Now that broadband access is nearly universal — 78% of homes, and that’s not counting all the schools and library and Wi-Fi hotspot connections available to most kids with minimal effort — restless youth don’t have to go along with whatever the local knuckleheads are up to.

They can find their community of likeminded souls online, and an unintended consequence of their tinkering with YouTube videos or playing “Call of Duty” with a buddy in Mexico City, they’re staying in. As a frustrated barman in England, where pubs have been closing in huge numbers, put it to The Economist, “Kids these days just want to live in their f- – – ing own little worlds in their bedrooms watching Netflix and becoming obese.” That sounds right, but at least no one ever got pregnant from eating Cheetos.

How are young people turning out politically? They’re liberal Democrats . . . who sometimes sound an awful lot like conservative Republicans.

According to a Pew survey, the “next-generation left” has a huge, generational disagreement with older, traditional left-liberals. Among the older liberals, for instance, 83% identify “circumstances” as the cause of poverty. Nexties are almost evenly split on this, with 47% blaming circumstances and 42% blaming “lack of effort.”

Fifty-six percent of the older Democrats think Wall Street does more harm than good, whereas 56% of the younger ones think the reverse. When asked whether blacks are primarily responsible for their condition or victims of discrimination, 80% of the older liberals said discrimination. Sixty-eight percent of the nexties said blacks are mostly responsible for their status, with only 19% blaming discrimination.

Less surprisingly, next-generation liberals tilt hugely left on social issues, and this, they say, is the reason they vote Democrat, in many cases against their stated economic beliefs. A commenter on a New York Times piece on the Pew survey ticked off a list of economic beliefs that placed him to the right of center, then concluded, “The Democrats hold onto us only because of the Republic[an] obsession with religion, sexual repression and environmental denial.”

Another way to spin that idea is that the Democrats hold onto young voters because of the media’s successful bid to paint Republicans as obsessed with these things. (Or was 2001-2009 America a Puritan theocracy?)

Libertarians (most notable among them the ever-hopeful crew over at Reason magazine) are forever claiming that their moment is about to arrive. They’ve never been right before, but their case is starting to look more compelling.

The gay-marriage debate is winding down and may be over by 2016. Some Republicans are outflanking the Hobby Lobby decision, and making a huge step in a libertarian direction, by calling for over-the-counter birth control. What if the Republican party starts to promote candidates who simply can’t be painted as sexually repressive, oil-crazed religious freaks?




Quotes:

"We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth... For my part, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst; and to provide for it." - Patrick Henry

"Politicians and diapers both need to be changed, and for the same reason." - Anonymous

"Right is right, even if everyone is against it, and wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it." - William Penn

"Naturally the common people don't want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country" - Hermann Goering

"I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do this I keep on doing." - Romans 7:18-19

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

Categories


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 59 other followers