05
Jun
08

The Revolution: A Manifesto

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I just bought Ron Paul’s new book, The Revolution: A Manifesto. I’ve only read a few chapters so far, but man-o-man the preface is something everyone should read, even if you disagree with the man! I hope that you enjoy it as much as I did…

Every election cycle we are treated to candidates who promise us “change,” and 2008 has been no different. But in the American political lexicon, “change” always means more of the same: more government, more looting of Americans, more inflation, more police-state measures, more unnecessary war, and more centralization of power.

Real change would mean something like the opposite of those things. It might even involve following our Constitution. And that’s the one option Americans are never permitted to hear.

Today we are living in a fantasy world. Our entitlement programs are insolvent: in a couple of decades they will face a shortfall amounting to tens of trillions of dollars. Meanwhile, the housing bubble is bursting and our dollar is collapsing. We are borrowing billions from China every day in order to prop up a bloated overseas presence that weakens our national defense and stirs up hostility against us. And all our political class can come up with is more of the same.

One columnist puts it like this: we are borrowing from Europe in order to defend Europe, we are borrowing from Japan in order to keep cheap oil flowing to Japan, and we are borrowing from Arab regimes in order to install democracy in Iraq. Is it really “isolationism” to find something wrong with this picture?

With national bankruptcy looming, politicians from both parties continue to make multi-trillion dollar promises of “free” goods from the government, and hardly a soul wonders if we can still afford to have troops in – this is not a misprint – 130 countries around the world. All of this is going to come to an end sooner or later, because financial reality is going to make itself felt in very uncomfortable ways. But instead of thinking about what this means for how we conduct our foreign and domestic affairs, our chattering classes seem incapable of speaking in anything but the emptiest platitudes, when they can be bothered to address serious issues at all. Fundamental questions like this, and countless others besides, are off the table in our mainstream media, which focuses our attention on trivialities and phony debates as we march toward oblivion.

This is the deadening consensus that crosses party lines, that dominates our major media, and that is strangling the liberty and prosperity that were once the birthright of Americans. Dissenters who tell their fellow citizens what is really going on are subject to smear campaigns that, like clockwork, are aimed at the political heretic. Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

There is an alternative to national bankruptcy, a bigger police state, trillion-dollar wars, and a government that draws ever more parasitically on the productive energies of the American people. It’s called freedom. But as we’ve learned through hard experience, we are not going to hear a word in its favor if our political and media establishments have anything to say about it.

If we want to live in a free society, we need to break free from these artificial limitations on free debate and start asking serious questions once again. I am happy that my campaign for the presidency has finally raised some of them. But this is a long-term project that will persist far into the future. These ideas cannot be allowed to die, buried beneath the mind-numbing chorus of empty slogans and inanities that constitute official political discourse in America.

That is why I wrote this book.

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3 Responses to “The Revolution: A Manifesto”


  1. 13 June 2008 at 21:38

    I quite agree with Ron on most things. He was my second favorite candidate, believe it or not, just behind Alan Keyes. Paul is also the cleanest candidate. Check his record. He’s virtually above reproach, which is more than I can say for the other candidates. He is certainly more conservative than McCain. But the Party along with the media and the Kool-Aid drinking electorate didn’t want a conservative to represent a party which has been…well… traditionally conservative. Face it Kyle: The GOP left us a long time ago and they ain’t comin’ back. On top of that, the fickle, spineless, masses are to stupidfied (I meant to say that) to understand what’s happening in this country. They’re perfectly content to be obsessed with Barbara Walters’ new book, Oprah, and the next pretty face with vacuous rhetoric. There. I crossed the line. I’ve now officially become elitist. Wrote a joke about it…here it goes:

    What’s the difference between the elitist meda and an elitist conservative?
    Answer: the elitist media actually wields enormous influence over pop-culture.

  2. 16 June 2008 at 04:30

    This is such a great read. I think this is something that needs to be read at least once. I think the audio version of the revolution a manifesto will keep people more interested though.

    Maybe do a book club or audio listening session in a room, house, rented hall or somewhere.

    great stuff.

  3. 18 June 2008 at 23:52

    I think everyone should read it as well (I’m not that far into it). It has wonderful ideas – ideas that are sound – not just political rhetoric with “hope” and “change.”


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Quotes:

"We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth... For my part, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst; and to provide for it." - Patrick Henry

"Politicians and diapers both need to be changed, and for the same reason." - Anonymous

"Right is right, even if everyone is against it, and wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it." - William Penn

"Naturally the common people don't want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country" - Hermann Goering

"I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do this I keep on doing." - Romans 7:18-19

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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