Posts Tagged ‘libertarian

22
May
16

America, What is wrong with the Libertarian platform?

The nominations are not set in stone, but it appears that we will probably have Hillary Clinton as the DNC candidate and Donald Trump as the GOP candidate. As most would agree neither is a very good candidate and have very serious flaws. Which once again makes me wonder why so many hold their noses and chose from either party when there are others.

Take a look at the Austin Peters platform:

Taxes & Spending

1. Reduce economic inequality by lowering barriers to entry in the marketplace, licensing, taxation, and fees. Urge congress to adopt the “Penny Plan,” across the board spending cuts of 1% per program. Abolish the existing, complicated tax code that discriminates against the most productive Americans, and replace it with a simple, flat tax at the lowest rate necessary to support the core functions of government. Seek voluntary ways to fund public services where possible, lotteries, tolls, etc.

National Defense & Military

2. Strengthen national security by reducing/ending foreign aid to nations hostile to the USA. Reconsider overseas troop deployments in areas not important to US national security, and audit the Pentagon. Reform the Veteran’s Affairs administration.

The American people have sacrificed enough blood and treasure in the Middle East. No more nation building. Obey the Constitution, and only go to war if it’s declared by congress. Consider constitutional Letters of Marque and Reprisal to deal with terrorists.

Free Trade

3. Lower barriers to trade with foreign nations, and allow American companies the leeway they need to develop domestic energy production, in order to create good paying jobs at home.

Monetary Policy

4. Audit the Federal Reserve first. End it through competition last. Institute a Monetary Commission devoted to studying the implications of replacing central banking with “Free Banking,” and abolishing laws of legal tender. Allow gold and silver to circulate as a currency, removing them from the commodity list, and make precious metal coins free of taxation. Let digital currencies compete against Federal Reserve notes.

Immigration

5. Streamline our immigration system by following updated “Ellis Island” styled protocols. Security check. Disease check. Done.

Constitutional Priorities

6. Work with congress to institute new protocols that will protect national security while placing the balance of weight towards due process and individual rights. Rein in the NSA, and demand accountability in our security agencies so as to protect our 4th Amendment rights.

Crime & Punishment

7. Reclassify the war on drugs as a medical problem, not a criminal problem. Deschedule all drugs at the federal level and end the federal War on Drugs once and for all.

Reforming Entitlements

8. Allow young people to opt out of Social Security.

Restoring Health Freedom

9. Overturn Obamacare. Seek out market alternatives to problems of health and wellness.

Defending Life

10. Encourage a culture of life, and adoption, and educate Americans about the “consistent pro-life ethic,” which also means abolishing the death penalty.

The only thing I am not sure about on that list is the immigration.

22
Aug
14

Has Freedom Finally Arrived? No, We’ll Have to Bring It!

Originally Found at CATO HERE.

The New York Times wonders if the libertarian moment has arrived. Unfortunately, there’ve been false starts before.

Ronald Reagan’s election seemed the harbinger of a new freedom wave. His rhetoric was great, but actual accomplishments lagged far behind.

So, too, with the 1994 Republican takeover of Congress.  Alas, the GOP in office behaved little different than many Democrats.

Since then there’s been even less to celebrate—in America, at least. George W. Bush was an avid proponent of “compassionate,” big-government conservatism. Federa outlays rose faster than under his Democratic predecessor. Barack Obama has continued Uncle Sam’s bailout tradition, promoting corporate welfare, pushing through a massive “stimulus” bill for the bank accounts of federal contractors, and seizing control of what remained private in the health care system.

Over the last half century, members of both parties took a welfare state that was of modest size despite the excesses of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal and put it on a fiscally unsustainable basis as part of the misnamed “Great Society.” Economist Lawrence Kotlikoff figures government’s total unfunded liability at around $220 trillion.

The national government has done no better with international issues. Trillions went for misnamed “foreign aid” that subsidized collectivism and autocracy. Trade liberalization faces determined resistance and often is blocked by countries that would gain great benefits from global commerce.

Even worse has been foreign policy. The joy people felt from the collapse of the Berlin Wall a quarter century ago has been forgotten.

The defense budget has turned into a new form of foreign aid for America’s populous and prosperous allies. The United States has been constantly at war, repeatedly proving that the Pentagon is no better at social engineering than is any other government agency.

Americans across the political spectrum agree that something is wrong, that the status quo is no good. But they disagree on the remedy.

However, the answer shouldn’t be that hard to discern. The definition of insanity, runs the old adage, is to keep doing the same thing while expecting different results.

By that definition, Washington policymakers are insane. The economy is slowing, people are falling behind economically, freedoms are being lost, and security fears are rising? No problem. Roll out the usual failed nostrums.

We know what the effect of these policies will be. All we have to do is look around the world and see what has happened.

It is this reality, not new personalities or generations, that is creating a libertarian moment. The 20th century killed off communism and fascism as serious alternatives. The chief competitor to this systems was not laissez-faire capitalism, as some suggested, but highly regulated and monumentally expensive welfare states. They were freer and more prosperous than their geopolitical antagonists—even a little capitalism goes a long way—but the erosion of liberty and prosperity has been constant.

Perhaps more debilitating was the corrosive effect on the foundational principles of a free society, such as independence, self-reliance, responsibility, accountability, and more. This assault in America continues with, for instance, the federal government turning health care into another massive entitlement, highlighted by pervasive regulation and income redistribution.

The obvious—and only—alternative to more government, which has failed so badly, is less government. Lower tax rates and rationalize complex tax systems. Cut the wasteful looting and pillaging that is a hallmark of today’s transfer society. Repeal unnecessary and relax unnecessarily stringent regulations, while making legitimate rules more market-friendly. Model liberty, prosperity, tolerance, and peace for others, allowing individual Americans going abroad to be America’s best ambassadors.

Has the libertarian moment arrived? The tyranny of the status quo, as Milton Friedman termed it, remains omnipresent and powerful. As a result, I point out in the Freeman, “the libertarian moment will not ‘arrive.’  It will have to be brought forward by those committed to a better and freer America.”

20
Jul
14

What Political Lean Will Today’s Kids Have?

I am the oldest kid in my family. On my mom’s side I am the oldest cousin too. On the “big two” subjects that will surely ruffle feathers, religion and politics, I have been all over the board and never fit neatly into any one group. Furthermore, I’ve openly discussed these things despite my mother’s advice to keep those subjects off the radar. With that said to some people they know that I am political, or at least politically-minded. I have been surprised to hear so many people discuss their political beliefs with me that I felt were right-leaning. Or more specifically, Libertarian-leaning. Maybe the next generation’s political beliefs are swinging back towards Conservatism. More interesting is what these kids use to judge their beliefs – how big of a role do their parents, demographic groups, or media play in making those decisions?

The conclusion of the article to me is interesting to me. It states, “What if the Republican party starts to promote candidates who simply can’t be painted as sexually repressive, oil-crazed religious freaks?” I find this interesting because I’ve long since said that the GOP needs to ditch its religious cloak. Religious affiliation is the number one complaint I hear for people who I think are clearly Republicans but vote Democrat.

Could the next generation of Republicans already be here? by Kyle Smith.

There’s probably never been a time when humanity wasn’t collectively in a torment and uproar about what its young folk were up to. (Gur to Urp, 10,000 B.C.: “Can you believe how short the girls are wearing their bearskins these days?”)

But in contrast with our image of decadent, self-centered, pleasure-craving youth, in many ways today’s youngsters are throwbacks — spurning drugs, crime and disorder, being sexually responsible and making sound choices about education. They might be the least disaffected, least rebellious kids since the Kennedy years. And that might have surprising political implications down the road.

A July 12 Economist piece reviewed some surprising data, finding that (contrary to popular belief) teen drinking and binge drinking have fallen sharply in recent years. The percentage of high-school seniors who have ever taken alcohol, for instance, fell from 80% to 71% from 2000 to 2010. In 1980, that figure was 93%. Asked whether they’d had a drink in the last 30 days, only 41% said yes in 2010. In 2000, it was 50% and in 1980, 72%. Similarly, the teen pregnancy rate is slightly more than half what it was in the mid-1990s, and teens are waiting longer to have sex than they did then.

Violent-crime arrests for people from 10 to 24 are half what they were in 1995 (for males) and down 40% for females. Juvenile incarceration is at its lowest rate since 1975. Teen smoking peaked around 1997 and is now, at an all-time low of 17%, less than half of what it was then. (Pot use is an exception to the trend: 23% of high-school seniors regularly get high. But weed is still less widely used than it was in the 1970s, or even in 1999, when 26.7% reported regular use.)

What’s behind all these surprising numbers? I can’t say, but it’s hard not to notice that a decline in destructive behavior associated with peer pressure has happened at the same moment that the US became a fully wired nation.

Now that broadband access is nearly universal — 78% of homes, and that’s not counting all the schools and library and Wi-Fi hotspot connections available to most kids with minimal effort — restless youth don’t have to go along with whatever the local knuckleheads are up to.

They can find their community of likeminded souls online, and an unintended consequence of their tinkering with YouTube videos or playing “Call of Duty” with a buddy in Mexico City, they’re staying in. As a frustrated barman in England, where pubs have been closing in huge numbers, put it to The Economist, “Kids these days just want to live in their f- – – ing own little worlds in their bedrooms watching Netflix and becoming obese.” That sounds right, but at least no one ever got pregnant from eating Cheetos.

How are young people turning out politically? They’re liberal Democrats . . . who sometimes sound an awful lot like conservative Republicans.

According to a Pew survey, the “next-generation left” has a huge, generational disagreement with older, traditional left-liberals. Among the older liberals, for instance, 83% identify “circumstances” as the cause of poverty. Nexties are almost evenly split on this, with 47% blaming circumstances and 42% blaming “lack of effort.”

Fifty-six percent of the older Democrats think Wall Street does more harm than good, whereas 56% of the younger ones think the reverse. When asked whether blacks are primarily responsible for their condition or victims of discrimination, 80% of the older liberals said discrimination. Sixty-eight percent of the nexties said blacks are mostly responsible for their status, with only 19% blaming discrimination.

Less surprisingly, next-generation liberals tilt hugely left on social issues, and this, they say, is the reason they vote Democrat, in many cases against their stated economic beliefs. A commenter on a New York Times piece on the Pew survey ticked off a list of economic beliefs that placed him to the right of center, then concluded, “The Democrats hold onto us only because of the Republic[an] obsession with religion, sexual repression and environmental denial.”

Another way to spin that idea is that the Democrats hold onto young voters because of the media’s successful bid to paint Republicans as obsessed with these things. (Or was 2001-2009 America a Puritan theocracy?)

Libertarians (most notable among them the ever-hopeful crew over at Reason magazine) are forever claiming that their moment is about to arrive. They’ve never been right before, but their case is starting to look more compelling.

The gay-marriage debate is winding down and may be over by 2016. Some Republicans are outflanking the Hobby Lobby decision, and making a huge step in a libertarian direction, by calling for over-the-counter birth control. What if the Republican party starts to promote candidates who simply can’t be painted as sexually repressive, oil-crazed religious freaks?

01
Sep
12

Tired of simply voting for the lesser of two evils?

So you don’t like Romney… and you don’t like Obama. Do you just toss a dice to pick your candidate? Not vote? Vote the “lesser of two evils”? Or do you vote your conscience for whoever matches you best?

I’m going to argue here that the reason we are where we are is because we have repeatedly failed to vote our consciences. Instead, we vote for someone that we, many times, are only lukewarm about. So we compromise, sometimes on very big and important issues. With millions of dollars being raised and spent on campaigning it seems only logical to inquire if elections are even fair anymore… or if they are bought.

I say it’s time to stop playing political games and vote for who best matches you instead of voting for someone who only kinda-sorta matches your beliefs. To help you find out what candidate best matches you please take this test and see who you align with the most. If you don’t know the answer to something, then skip that question.

30
Aug
12

Is it worth it to write in Ron Paul?

Only a few states may count and report a Write-in Vote for Ron Paul.

8 States do not allow any write-in votes.
8 States have sore loser laws that prevent someone who ran in the primary from being a write in candidate.
24 States require a write-in candidate to sign and notarize paperwork to be a write-in candidate and it is unlikely that Ron Paul will do this.
10 States may allow a write-candidate but the votes will not necessarily be counted or reported.

There is a Liberty Candidate with policies that closely align with Ron Paul’s that will be on the ballot in all 50 States. Gary Johnson is a two term Governor (term limits) from New Mexico that has always supported Liberty. He vetoed more bills as Governor than all other Governor’s combined and turned New Mexico from being heavily in debt to having a budget surplus all while cutting taxes. Gary Johnson has more executive government experience than Obama and Romney combined! Gary Johnson is the Presidential Candidate for the Libertarian Party, a party that Ron Paul is an honorary member for life, and was the Presidential Candidate for in 1988.Please take a look at Gary Johnson’s website:http://GaryJohnson2012.com/

Check out the current status of Gary Johnson’s ballot access. Please note that in some states the date to start petitioning is still weeks away:http://www.lp.org/2012-ballot-access

See State-by-State rules pertaining to a write-in campaign. Please note that there are links for each state and on each page there are links to the states website with the rules: http://writein2008.blogspot.com/

The Federal Elections Commission reports that Ron Paul got 42,426 votes as a write-in in 2008 while the Libertarian Party candidate got 523,715 votes, more than 10 times as many. More may have voted for Paul but because of the rules they were not counted or reported. Gary Johnson is a much better candidate than the candidate that the Libertarian Party ran in 2008 and will surely get many more votes. Gary will be on the ballot in all 50 states.

Federal Election Commission 2008 Presidential Votes:
http://www.fec.gov/pubrec/fe2008/tables2008.pdf

Should we split the Liberty Vote and write-in a name that will not be counted in most states or should we unify and Vote for Gary Johnson who will be on the ballot in all 50 states? I know that for myself to feel good about my vote I would have to think that I was doing something that had some chance of advancing the Liberty Movement and keeping the message alive. A vote that is not counted is a wasted vote when there is a voting option that will send a powerful message of Liberty. If 4/5 the people that might write-in Ron Paul’s name would not have their vote counted or reported then what chance is there of the message you are trying to send ever being heard? Let’s unify and send a message by voting for Libertarian Party Presidential Candidate Gary Johnson!

Please check out the facebook page, “Ron Paul Supporters Taking A Look At Gary Johnson – Libertarian”: http://www.facebook.com/groups/170478946416753/

12
Apr
10

What is a Libertarian?

For some time now I’ve considered myself a Conservative Libertarian.

02
Jan
09

Drew Carey on Politics

Old, but good (original here).

Price Is Right’s Drew Carey Shows His Libertarian Colors

Tuesday, October 16, 2007 2:55 PM

Comedian Drew Carey, who debuted Monday as the host of “The Price Is Right,” is showing his libertarian colors by participating in a series of videos for the Reason Foundation’s new Web site Reason.tv.

The short videos will focus on the libertarian think tank’s belief in what it calls “free minds and free markets.”

Carey said in a statement issued by Reason: “We need Reason to help fight the stupid drug laws, the stupid immigration laws, and stupid big government in general.”

In his first video, Carey examines traffic congestion in Los Angeles and the ways the private sector – rather than taxpayers – can solve the problem.

Ten years ago, according to NewsBusters.org, Carey told Reason magazine about government: “The less the better. As far as your personal goals are and what you actually want to do with your life, it should never have to do with the government. You should never depend on the government for your retirement, your financial security, for anything. If you do, you’re screwed.”

Carey has been politically active over the years. He performed at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner in 2002, and the ex-Marine entertained troops in Iraq in 2003.

He’s been a financial backer of Republican Sen. George Voinovich of Ohio, Reuters reported, and in 1998 led a “smoke-in” in defiance of a no-smoking ordinance.

More recently, he has expressed his distaste for the Bush administration’s handling of the Iraq war.




Quotes:

"We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth... For my part, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst; and to provide for it." - Patrick Henry

"Politicians and diapers both need to be changed, and for the same reason." - Anonymous

"Right is right, even if everyone is against it, and wrong is wrong, even if everyone is for it." - William Penn

"Naturally the common people don't want war; neither in Russia, nor in England, nor in America, nor in Germany. That is understood. But after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country" - Hermann Goering

"I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For what I do is not the good I want to do; no, the evil I do not want to do this I keep on doing." - Romans 7:18-19

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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